Displaying items by tag: politics

Braving scorching conditions, a new wave of coronavirus infections and government warnings they could be breaking the law, hundreds of thousands of Hong Kongers took part in a primary election for the city's democratic opposition over the weekend. The vote, held 10 days after China imposed a sweeping new security law on the city, was designed to narrow down the number of pro-democracy candidates in September elections to the city's legislature. The opposition camp is hoping to seize a historic majority in the parliament, through careful coordination to avoid splitting the pro-democracy vote, and in making headway in the functional constituencies, seats chosen by business and professional groups which form half of the legislature.
Published in Around The World
When the UK announced its U-turn on allowing the Chinese telecoms giant Huawei to play a part in the country's 5G network, it signaled an end to the so-called "golden era" of UK-China relations. To the delight of US President Donald Trump, the UK would seemingly no longer equivocate on its national security in order to balance its relationship with China -- and would instead adopt something closer to a US-style hard line. Oliver Dowden, the UK's secretary of state for Culture, Media and Sport, said that the US sanctions imposed on Huawei in May had "significantly changed" the landscape. "Given the uncertainty this creates around Huawei's supply chain, the UK can no longer be confident it will be able to guarantee the security of future Huawei 5G equipment." While the Huawei decision might in practice only be a reversal on one specific issue, it represents a huge symbolic win for British China hawks, who have been uncomfortable with the creep towards greater engagement with Beijing over the past two decades and have recently advocated for a much tougher stance on China, similar to that of the US government.
Published in Around The World
India became the third country after the United States and Brazil to report one million coronavirus cases on Friday, according to the country's health ministry. So how did the world's second-most populated country get here? India reported its first case on January 30 -- the patient in the southern Indian state of Kerala had been studying in Wuhan, the Chinese city where the first known case of Covid-19 was recorded last December. For weeks, as coronavirus outbreaks took off in other parts of Asia, India remained relatively unaffected. It wasn't until March 13 that the country reported its first death -- and even then, it had only recorded 73 cases.
Published in Around The World
The United Arab Emirates successfully launched its Mars-bound Hope Probe on Sunday, marking the the Arab world's first interplanetary mission -- and the first of three international missions to the Red Planet this summer. The Hope Probe took off from the Tanegashima Space Center in Japan, after a delay last week due to bad weather. The solid rocket booster successfully separated from the launch vehicle, and the probe has established two-way communication with the ground segment in Dubai. The Al Amal probe, as it is called in Arabic, is expected to reach Mars by February 2021. It will be the first time the UAE has orbited Mars, and the probe will stay in orbit for a Martian year -- equivalent to 687 days on Earth -- to gather data about Mars' atmosphere.
Published in Around The World
President Trump, who loves to spar with the press, took no questions. That was a clear sign that he wanted the day’s message to be laser-focused on the economy, without distractions from journalists asking about Russian bounties or other controversies. The economic news was so good yesterday--and so much better than expected--that the president would have been guilty of political malpractice had he not emerged to brag about it. And if the encouraging numbers help his campaign, and hurt Joe Biden, so be it. It’s great news for the country, and Democrats shouldn’t fall into the trap of rooting for calamity to boost their candidate.
Published in Politics
A prominent Delaware law firm founded by presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden received a Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loan for between $150,000 and $350,000, according to records released Monday by the Treasury Department and the Small Business Administration. The Trump campaign told Fox News that the records conflict with recent messaging from the Biden campaign that the PPP program is both ineffective and a vehicle to reward Trump "cronies." “Instead of attacking President Trump as an involuntary reflex, maybe Joe Biden should just say ‘thank you’ once in a while," Trump campaign director of communications Tim Murtaugh told Fox News. "The PPP saved 51 million jobs nationally, including at Biden’s old law firm and a number of companies connected to Obama administration alums. A very likely explanation is that Biden simply doesn’t know what he’s talking about and would rather make a political weapon out of a program that helped people make their rent and mortgage payments.”
Published in Politics
That user also removed information that was critical of Harris, with some other editors on the "talk" page objecting to changes regarding Harris' relationship with former California Assembly Speaker Willie Brown that were allegedly made "without adequate justification." Users also objected to changes related to Harris' record as an aggressive prosecutor, with one editor making a change on July 2 -- after The Intercept published its story -- saying they were "restoring more scrubbed well-sourced content. Just because it may be 'unflattering' doesn't mean it needs to be censored." The information added in that edit included a line on how Harris "appealed a judge's order to take over the prosecution of a high-profile mass murder case and to eject all 250 prosecutors from the Orange County District Attorney's office over allegations of misconduct by Republican D.A. Tony Rackauckas." As The Intercept reported, that section was removed by the prolific editor on June 11, who said he was "proofreading for length."
Published in Politics
President Trump on Monday lashed out at NASCAR and questioned why Bubba Wallace, the auto racing company's only Black driver, hasn't apologized after the highly publicized investigation over a rope found in his garage that, Trump claimed, turned out to be a hoax. “Has @BubbaWallace apologized to all of those great NASCAR drivers and officials who came to his aid, stood by his side, and were willing to sacrifice everything for him, only to find out that the whole thing was just another HOAX?” Trump wrote on Twitter Monday morning. “That and Flag decision has caused lowest ratings EVER!”
Published in Politics
The campaign rally – at Pease International Airport – will be the president's second since the coronavirus pandemic swept across the country in March, forcing most Americans to huddle in their homes to prevent the spread of the virus and triggering the freefall of much of the nation’s economy. When announcing the event over the weekend, the Trump campaign emphasized that “there will be ample access to hand sanitizer and all attendees will be provided a face mask that they are strongly encouraged to wear.”
Published in Politics
The credibility of the World Health Organization (WHO) and its dealings with the Chinese government in the early days of the pandemic have once again come under scrutiny following revelations that the U.N.-backed global health body tacitly changed its coronavirus timeline to disclose that it initially heard about the novel virus outbreak from the Internet, not Beijing officials as it has long insisted. According to multiple reports, the revisions were made on the WHO website on June 29, adding fuel to the fire that the Chinese leadership long purported to cover up the new virus, formally termed COVID-19, and that the WHO assisted them in doing so.
Published in Around The World
Page 1 of 2

Lastnews

More Demos

NEWSLETTER